Amosa Vineyard

Our vineyard is situated in Napareuli village, in Kakheti – the largest winemaking region in Georgia.

The village is renowned for its appellation wine of the same name.
Nestled in the picturesque Alazani River in the heart of Georgia’s renowned wine region, Kakheti, it has been recognized as one of the most fertile lands for centuries, making us extremely fortunate to obtain it.
Our 4 year old vineyard is a testament to the perfect combination of nature’s gifts and modern winemaking excellence.

SOIL

Our vineyard's soil is a treasure unto itself. Fallow and untouched by cultivation before we took stewardship, its composition is nothing short of remarkable. The terrain is a harmonious blend of alluvial deposits, strongly skeletal, loamy soil on a limestone bedrock, creating a terroir that is the envy of the valley. 20 hectares of land can easily produce 150000 bottles annually. The vineyard can be expanded with nearby pieces of land of similar condition.

CLIMATE

The climate is transitional from humid subtropical to continental under the influence of the Great Caucasus Mountains from the left bank of Alazani River and Tsiv-Gombori mountain range from the right. Cold air flows down the valley from the Caucasus glaciers, forming an ambient microclimate for quality viticulture with large swings between day and night temperatures, thus, ensuring perfect grape ripening conditions.

WATER

Innovative Irrigation: We've introduced a high-tech irrigation system to ensure our vineyard consistently produces abundant, top-quality grapes. This system takes care of our vines by providing the perfect amount of water exactly when they require it, keeping our vineyard lush and productive every year. A Private Water Source: While we have the privilege of the nearby Alazani River, we've also ensured a consistent water supply through a private drilled well right on our premises. The reliable irrigation guarantees the well-being of our vines, even in the driest of seasons.

OPERATIONS

Designed with spaciousness and efficiency in mind, our vineyard features a modern layout that ensures ease of access for tractors and vineyard personnel. The expansion of our operations can be achieved by acquiring adjacent lands. We incorporate new equipment and utilize the newest stainless steel tanks at our facility. Thanks to the modern, easily adaptable modular construction, our factory can be seamlessly extended as we continue to scale up our business operations.

Our Grape Varieties

We’ve devoted 20 hectares of our vineyards to indigenous Georgian grape varieties, each with its unique charm and character:

At the heart of our vineyard are top-quality vines, carefully selected to deliver the finest grapes for winemaking. We’ve planted classic Saperavi vines, renowned for their rich flavor. Alongside them, you’ll discover a splendid array of Georgian white varieties, including Mukhamtsvane, Kisi, and Chinuri, offering diversity in taste and the potential for unique flavor profiles. Amosa vineyard boasts a rich diversity that enables us to introduce entirely distinctive wines to the global palate.
Presently, we craft a collection of 12 distinct wine types and actively explore innovative grape combinations.

saperavi
Saperavi

This dark-skinned, pink-fleshed grape, with its name meaning 'dye' in Georgian, is truly exceptional. It yields an expressive wine with a distinctive bouquet, a well-balanced taste, and a delightful touch of astringency.

shavkapito

Shavkapito

The name of this grape translates to 'vine with a black cane.' Shavkapito boasts an impressive chemical profile, including alcohol content, acidity, volatile acidity, extract, tannin, glycerin, and more. Its taste and color are equally noteworthy.

kisi

Kisi

An often-overlooked gem from Kakheti, Kisi produces high-quality white table wines. Its gentle, harmonious taste reveals rich hints of ripe fruit that enchant wine lovers, while the subtle aftertaste leaves a trail of apples. Wines crafted in qvevri showcase aromas of ripe pear, marigold, tobacco, and walnut.

chinuri

Chinuri

This white grape variety has a long history of producing both excellent wines and table grapes. The name 'Chinuri' reflects its indigenous heritage. Wines made from Chinuri grapes have a pleasing light brown hue and a soft, gentle, full-bodied character, harmoniously balancing alcohol and acidity.

mtsvane

Mtsvane

Mtsvane is an indigenous Georgian grape, named for its green color. It's used to craft aromatic, fruity, and balanced white wines, often blended with Rkatsiteli for a fruity, aromatic table wine.

mukhamtsvane

Mukhamtsvane

Among the rarest grape varieties, Mukhamtsvane yields a straw-colored wine that's truly unique. This grape's potential is still not fully explored even by experts in ampelography and enology.

Our dedication to preserving and nurturing these distinctive Georgian grape varieties reflects our commitment to producing wines that captivate the senses and tell the story of our exceptional vineyard.

Wines of Georgia

1. The Oldest Wine-producing Country

The Georgian winemaking industry boasts a unique heritage, with a history dating back 8,000 years, making it the oldest wine-producing country in the world.

2. Qvevri

The fusion of varietal distinctiveness and the time-honored tradition of Qvevri winemaking allows the unparalleled tastes and flavors to emerge. Georgian Qvevri-crafted wines from indigenous grapes (like Kisi, Saperavi, and Shavkapito) offer an unmatched synthesis found nowhere else. In contemporary times, some Georgian winemakers have adeptly combined traditional and European winemaking methods, preserving authenticity while embracing innovation.

3. 500+ Indigenous Grapevines

Georgia features more than 500 varieties of indigenous grapes—nearly one-sixth of the world’s grape varieties—including endangered vines found nowhere else on Earth. This range is underpinned by Georgia's optimal soil and climate conditions, ideal for grape cultivation.

4. Culture

This diversity provides winemakers with a broad spectrum of grapes to produce a wide array of wines, each possessing a unique character. The industry's significance is underscored by its recognition on UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage List, highlighting its deep-rooted cultural importance.